From the Blog

The Thinking Atheist's Take on Unitarian Universalism

It's always interesting to hear an outside perspective on Unitarian Universalism. Seth Andrews, host of The Thinking Atheist podcast, did a podcast called The Unitarians, on March 3. (You can pick it up at 7:15 if you're only interested in the actual topic.)

Seth interviewed UUHA board member David Breeden, minister at First Unitarian Society of Minneapolis, as well as Mike Werner, author of "Regaining Balance: The Evolution of the UUA", a book published by the UU Humanists, and others.

Please give it a listen. What did you think? Was it a fair overview of UU? And specifically, what did you think of Seth's conclusion? Read more about The Thinking Atheist's Take on Unitarian Universalism »

A Humanist Take on Meaning and Purpose

Have you ever felt like you go through the motions every day but it all seems meaningless? Did you know that you can use science to help you find a sense of life purpose? Wait, but science can’t answer life’s big questions – that’s the job of religion, right? Well, a wave of recent research in psychology, cognitive neuroscience, and other disciplines has explored how we find meaning and purpose in life, with or without belief in a deity!

I wish I knew that when I was growing up. I struggled with gaining a sense of life meaning and purpose throughout my teenage years and young adulthood. I remember experiencing the sense of meaninglessness as an emptiness deep in the pit of my stomach. Read more about A Humanist Take on Meaning and Purpose »

The Clergy Letter Project: Demonstrating the Compatibility of Religion and Science

There’s an all-too common view in the United States that religion and science are in conflict.  While this conflict takes many forms, none is more prevalent than that associated with the evolution/creation debate.  Simply put, there are some who proclaim loudly and often that one can’t be truly religious if evolution is accepted.  The basic premise of this position is that people must choose between their religion and modern science; that it is impossible to embrace both.

In fact, however, despite the volume of these claims, this position is very much at odds with what a huge majority of devout individuals understand.  In an attempt to share this message as broadly as possible, I created a grassroots organization that has grown to more than 15,000 clergy members.  This organization, The Clergy Letter Project, has three clear and simple goals: Read more about The Clergy Letter Project: Demonstrating the Compatibility of Religion and Science »

“God” as Creativity

When a distinguished scientist and an eminent theologian agree on what is meant by God we should take notice.  The scientist is complexity theorist Stuart Kauffman whose recent book is entitled Reinventing the Sacred.  Like many he has left traditional religion behind, but he wants to retain a sense of the sacred nature of life, and he finds that sacred quality in creativity.  Creativity, he suggests, is at the heart of things and in the very nature of the universe.  In fact he identifies creativity with God, suggesting that what he means by God is simply creativity.  He writes: “God is our chosen name for the ceaseless creativity in the natural universe, biosphere, and human cultures.”  He comes to this conclusion because “This creativity is stunning, awesome and worthy of reverence.” Read more about “God” as Creativity »

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